Professional Commitments

These commitments guide the way I work and live.

  1. See the best in people.  Enable the creation of opportunities and structures that allow the people I work with to fulfill their full potentials.
  2. Lead through example.  Be the desired change.  If I don’t take responsibility, who will?
  3. Change is inevitable.  Commit to life-long learning to build adaptability and resilency to view change as an opportunity for growth.
  4. Balance analytical rigor and human sensitivity.  It can be easy to get lost in numbers but when people are affected, acknowledge and value the impacts of actions on individuals.
  5. Tackle important problems. Daniel Schon, American philosopher and industrial consultant writes, “In the varied topography of professional practice, there is a high, hard  ground overlooking a swamp.  On the high ground, manageable problems lend themselves to solutions through the use of research­ based theory and technique.  In the swampy lowlands, problems are messy and confusing  and incapable of technical solution.  The irony of this situation is that the problems of the high ground tend to be relatively unimportant to individuals or society at large, however great their technical interest may be, while  in the swamp lie the problems of greatest human concern.  The practitioner is confronted with a choice. Shall he remain on the high ground where he can solve relatively unimportant problems according to his standards of rigor, or shall he descend to the swamp of important problems where he cannot be rigorous in any way he  knows how to describe”.  I fearlessly pursue important problems, even if I encounter a bit of dirt along the way.
  6. Time is precious.  I aspire to spend my time meaningfully and efficiently, and  I strive to utilize other people’s time and talents in valuable ways.

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